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Protecting the Ocean We Need - Securing the Future We Want

Greenpeace to launch new report: “30 x 30: Blueprint for Ocean Protection

Greenpeace is urging governments at the UN to create a strong Global Ocean Treaty which could pave the way for the protection of at least 30% of the world's oceans by 2030 via a network of ocean sanctuaries. Over the next 12 months, Greenpeace will sail from the Arctic to the Antarctic, undertaking ground-breaking research and investigations, and using what we find to inspire millions around the world to join us in supporting healthy oceans and a strong Global Ocean Treaty by 2020. Ahead of the second Intergovernmental Conference, Greenpeace has been engaging with decision makers in more than 20 capitals worldwide. Our political team will also be heading to New York.  Greenpeace’s  briefing to the IGC2 offers recommendations for improved text on Marine Protected Areas.

 

Report release: “30 x 30: Blueprint for Ocean Protection” (April 4) - A team of scientists led by experts from the Universities of York, Oxford and Edinburgh in the UK studied how best to design a global network of ocean sanctuaries that could protect the full spectrum of marine life in the global oceans. Built around the existing marine protected areas in international waters, the network designs presented here protect 30% and 50% of the more than 450 conservation features included in the analysis. Their findings, including an interactive map to explore the research, will launch on April 4th. Will you be in New York? Join our side event on April 4 1:15-2:30 pm at the UN Headquarters to hear all about it!

 

Campaign launch: “Protect the Oceans” (April 11) - Greenpeace will be setting sail on a year-long Pole to Pole expedition to visit hotspots for protection on the high seas, as identified in its new report. Special guests at the launch event in London include Professor Callum Roberts, marine biologist and co-author of 30x30: A Blueprint for Ocean Protection, and Princess Esmeralda of Belgium, and the UK’s Environment Secretary Michael Gove.